Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/10775
Title: Metabolic syndrome attenuates ulcerative colitis: Correlation with interleukin-10 and galectin-3 expression
Authors: Jovanovic M.
Simovic Markovic, Bojana
Gajovic N.
Jurisevic M.
djukic, aleksandar
Jovanovic I.
Arsenijevic, Nebojsa
Lukic, Aleksandra
Zdravković N.
Journal: World Journal of Gastroenterology
Issue Date: 21-Nov-2019
Abstract: © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. BACKGROUND Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic disease characterized by inflammation of intestinal epithelium, primarily of the colon. An increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in patients with UC has been documented recently. Still, there is no evidence that MetS alters the course of the UC. AIM To test the influence of the MetS on the severity of UC and the local and systemic immune status. METHODS Eighty nine patients with de novo histologically confirmed UC were divided in two groups, according to ATP III criteria: Group without MetS (no MetS) and group with MetS. RESULTS Clinically and histologically milder disease with higher serum level of immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) and fecal content of Galectin-3 (Gal-3) was observed in subjects with UC and MetS, compared to subjects suffering from UC only. This was accompanied with predomination of IL-10 over pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-17 (IL-17) in the sera as well as Gal-3 over TNF-α and IL-17 in feces of UC patients with MetS. Further, the patients with both conditions (UC and MetS) had higher percentage of IL-10 producing and Gal-3 expressing innate and acquired immune cells in lamina propria. CONCLUSION Local dominance of Gal-3 and IL-10 over pro-inflammatory mediators in patients with MetS may present a mechanism for limiting the inflammatory process and subsequent tissue damage in UC.
URI: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/10775
Type: article
DOI: 10.3748/wjg.v25.i43.6465
ISSN: 10079327
SCOPUS: 85075998394
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kragujevac

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