Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/11822
Title: Role of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 as biomarkers in early and late stages of schizophrenia
Authors: Pantovic Stefanovic M.
Stojadinovic N.
Dunjić-Kostić B.
Velimirovic M.
Nikolić Z.
Jurisic, Vladimir
Lackovic M.
Damjanovic, Ana
Totic-Poznanovic S.
Mitrovic-Jovanovic A.
Ivković M.
Journal: Journal of Psychiatric Research
Issue Date: 1-Feb-2016
Abstract: © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Schizophrenia (SZ) is a neuroprogressive disorder presenting with biochemical, functional, and structural changes, which differ from early to late stages of the illness. We explored the differences in serum levels of soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) between early and late stages of SZ, in regard to clinical characteristics and treatment application. Serum levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were measured in 80 patients with SZ (40 early stage; 40 late stage), and compared with 80 healthy controls, matched by age, gender, body mass index, and smoking habits with each SZ group. Serum levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were measured using ELISA. The severity of psychopathology was assessed using the Clinical Global Impression Scale and five-factor Positive and Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia Scale. After adjustment for confounders, we noticed normal levels of sICAM-1 in the early stage, and elevated levels of sICAM-1 in the late stage of SZ. sVCAM-1 levels were decreased in both stages of SZ. Higher sICAM-1 levels have been related to more pronounced cognitive deficit and excitement symptoms in the early stage of SZ and to favorable characteristics of treatment application in both stages. SZ is associated with changes in the levels of adhesion molecules that vary from early to late stages of the illness. This implies that the concept of biochemical staging is applicable in SZ, at least for markers of cellular adhesion.
URI: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/11822
Type: Article
DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.11.002
ISSN: 00223956
SCOPUS: 84958972647
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kragujevac
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