Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/12425
Title: Oxidative stress in rheumatoid arthritis patients: Relationship to diseases activity
Authors: Veselinović M.
Jeremić N.
Vuletic, Milena
Zivkovic V.
Tomic Lucic, Aleksandra
Djuric, Dragan M.
Jakovljevic V.
Journal: Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2014
Abstract: The aim of this study was to assess the oxidative stress status in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by measuring markers of free radical production, systemic activity of disease, and levels of antioxidant. 52 RA patients and 30 healthy controls were included in the study, and clinical examination and investigations were performed and disease activity was assessed. Peripheral blood samples were used for all the assays. We assessed the markers of oxidative stress, including plasma levels of index of lipid peroxidation-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O 2), superoxide anion radical (O2-), nitric oxide (NO), and superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), catalase activity (CAT) and glutathione levels in erythrocytes. In the RA group, levels of H 2O2, O2-, and TBARS were significantly higher than in controls (4.08 ± 0.31 vs. 2.39 ± 0.13 nmol/l, p < 0.01; 8.90 ± 1.28 vs. 3.04 ± 0.38 nmol/l, p < 0.01, 3.65 ± 0.55 vs. 1.06 ± 0.17 μmol/l, p < 0.01). RA patients had significantly increased SOD activity compared with healthy controls (2,918.24 ± 477.14 vs. 643.46 ± 200.63UgHbx103, p < 0.001). Patients had significantly higher levels of pro-oxidants (O2-, H2O2, and TBARS) compared to controls, despite significantly higher levels of SOD. Significant differences were also observed in serum levels of NO in patients with high-diseases activity. Our findings support an association between oxidative/nitrosative stress and RA. Stronger response in samples with higher diseases activity suggests that oxidative/nitrosative stress markers may be useful in evaluating the progression of RA as well as in elucidating the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media.
URI: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/12425
Type: Article
DOI: 10.1007/s11010-014-2006-6
ISSN: 03008177
SCOPUS: 84900824425
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kragujevac
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