Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/12600
Title: Hyperhomocysteinemia: An instigating factor for periodontal disease
Authors: Stanisic D.
George A.
Smolenkova I.
Singh M.
Tyagi S.
Journal: Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2021
Abstract: © 2021, Canadian Science Publishing. All rights reserved. Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) affects bone remodeling, since a destructive process in cortical alveolar bone has been linked to it; however, the mechanism remains at large. HHcy increases proinflammatory cytokines viz. TNF-a, IL-1b, IL-6, and IL-8 that leads to a cascade that negatively impacts methionine metabolism and homocysteine cycling. Further, chronic inflammation decreases vitamins B12, B6, and folic acid that are required for methionine homocysteine homeostasis. This study aims to investigate a HHcy mouse model (cystathionine b-synthase deficient, CBS+/– ) for studying the potential pathophysiological changes, if any, in the periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cement, and alveolar bone). We compared the periodontium side-by-side in the CBS+/– model with that of the wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice. Histology and histo-morphometry of the mandibular bone along with gene expression analyses were carried out. Also, proangiogenic proteins and metalloproteinases were studied. To our knowledge, this research shows, for the first time, a direct connection between periodontal disease during CBS deficiency, thereby suggesting the existence of disease drivers during the hyperho-mocysteinemic condition. Our findings offer opportunities to develop diagnostics/therapeutics for people who suffer from chronic metabolic disorders like HHcy.
URI: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/12600
Type: Article
DOI: 10.1139/cjpp-2020-0224
ISSN: 00084212
SCOPUS: 85099871408
Appears in Collections:University Library, Kragujevac
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