Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/13905
Title: ANALYSIS OF CRANIO-CEREBRAL INJURIES AND MORTALITY PATTERN IN ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS-RETROSPECTIVE, AUTOPSY STUDY
Authors: Minic Z.
Vitosevic, Katarina
Todorovic, Danijela
Vuletic, Milena
Todorovic, Milos
Journal: Romanian Journal of Legal Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Sep-2021
Abstract: Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of cranio-cerebral injuries among road traffic subjects. Methods. This was a retrospective, analytical, epidemiological and cross-sectional study that investigated road traffic deaths for period between 2001-2016 year. This study included 525 subjects, who died as a result trauma following road traffic collisions. Results. In the study sample, 64.6% (339/525) of subjects suffered from cranio-cerebral injuries. There were 256 (75.5%) men and 83 (24.5%) women. Pedestrians, bicyclists and motorcyclists were the most vulnerable participants when it comes to skull bone fractures and brain tissue injuries. From the total number of 525, 55.4% subjects died at the scene of the accident or on their way to the hospital, while 44.6% subjects survived the injuries for a certain period of time. Trimodal distribution of dying was observed: at the scene of the accident, after 6 hours, and after 7 days. Cranio-cerebral injury was the leading cause of death in the group of subjects who died at the scene of the accident and in the group of subjects who survived the injuries for the certain period of time. It was observed that the brainstem lacerations, skull fractures destructions, brain tissue destructions, simultaneous occurrence of cranio-cerebral, chest and abdominal injury or simultaneous occurrence of cranio-cerebral and abdominal injury in a higher percentage lead to death at the scene. Conclusion. Recognition of these features would be useful in designing effective accident prevention strategies and in hospital treatment of RTA trauma patients.
URI: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/13905
Type: Article
DOI: 10.4323/rjlm.2021.287
ISSN: 12218618
SCOPUS: 85123076551
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kragujevac
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