Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/14063
Title: Breast cancer and p16: Role in proliferation, malignant transformation and progression
Authors: Jovanovic D.
Mitrović V.
Milosavljevic, Milos
Ilic M.
Stankovic, Vesna
Vuletic, Milena
Dimitrijevic Stojanovic, Milica
Milošev D.
Azanjac G.
Nedeljkovic V.
Radovanovic D.
Journal: Healthcare (Switzerland)
Issue Date: 1-Sep-2021
Abstract: The definition of new molecular biomarkers could provide a more reliable approach in predicting the prognosis of invasive breast cancers (IBC). The aim of this study is to analyze the expression of p16 protein in IBC, as well as its participation in malignant transformation. The study included 147 patients diagnosed with IBC. The presence of non-invasive lesions (NIL) was noted in each IBC and surrounding tissue. p16 expression was determined by reading the percentage of nuclear and/or cytoplasmic expression in epithelial cells of IBC and NIL, but also in stromal fibroblasts. Results showed that expression of p16 increases with the progression of cytological changes in the epithelium; it is significantly higher in IBC compared to NIL (p < 0.0005). Cytoplasmic p16 expression is more prevalent in IBC (76.6%), as opposed to nuclear staining, which is characteristic of most NIL (21.1%). There is a difference in p16 expression between different molecular subtypes of IBC (p = 0.025). In the group of p16 positive tumors, pronounced mononuclear infiltrates (p = 0.047) and increased expression of p16 in stromal fibroblasts (p = 0.044) were noted. In conclusion, p16 protein plays an important role in proliferation, malignant transformation, as well as in progression from NIL to IBC.
URI: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/14063
Type: Article
DOI: 10.3390/healthcare9091240
SCOPUS: 85115816857
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kragujevac
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