Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/9713
Title: Efficient differentiation of human embryonic stem Cells into Functional Cerebellar-Like Cells
Authors: Erceg S.
Ronaghi M.
Zipančić I.
Laínez S.
Roselló M.
Xiong C.
Moreno-Manzano V.
Rodríguez-Jiménez F.
Planells R.
Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel
Bhattacharya S.
Stojkovíc M.
Journal: Stem Cells and Development
Issue Date: 1-Nov-2010
Abstract: The cerebellum has critical roles in motor and sensory learning and motor coordination. Many cerebellum-related disorders indicate cell therapy as a possible treatment of neural loss. Here we show that application of inductive signals involved in early patterning of the cerebellar region followed by application of different factors directs human embryonic stem cell differentiation into cerebellar-like cells such as granule neurons, Purkinje cells, interneuron, and glial cells. Neurons derived using our protocol showed a T-shaped polarity phenotype and express similar markers to the developed human cerebellum. Electrophysiological measurements confirmed functional electrical properties compatible with these cells. In vivo implantation of differentiated human embryonic stem cells transfected with MATH1-GFP construct into neonatal mice resulted in cell migration across the molecular and the Purkinje cell layers and settlement in the internal molecular layers. Our findings demonstrate that the universal mechanisms involved in the development of cerebellum can be efficiently recapitulated in vitro, which enables the design of new strategies for cell replacement therapy, to study early human development and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. © Copyright 2010, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
URI: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/9713
Type: Article
DOI: 10.1089/scd.2009.0498
ISSN: 15473287
SCOPUS: 78049384146
Appears in Collections:University Library, Kragujevac
[ Google Scholar ]

Page views(s)

17

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
10.1089-scd.2009.0498.pdf1.68 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open


Items in SCIDAR are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.