Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/11425
Title: Numerical modeling of the cupular displacement and motion of otoconia particles in a semicircular canal
Authors: Djukic, Tijana
Filipovic, Nenad
Issue Date: 2017
Abstract: © 2017, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Balance is achieved and maintained by a balance system called a labyrinth that is composed of three semicircular canals and the otolith organs that sense linear gravity and acceleration. Within each semicircular canal, there is a gelatinous structure called the cupula, which is deformed under the influence of the surrounding endolymph. One of the balance disorders is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and one of the pathological conditions that have been identified as possible causes of this syndrome is canalithiasis—disturbance of the endolymph flow and cupular displacement caused by the free-moving otoconia particles within the lumen of the canal. Analysis of phenomena occurring within the semicircular canal can help to explain some balance-related disorders and the response of the vestibular system to external perturbations under various pathological conditions. Numerical simulations allow a study of the influence of a wide range of factors, without the need to perform experiments and clinical examinations. In case of canalithiasis, an accurate explanation and tracking of the motion of otoconia particles in vivo is obviously nearly impossible. In this study, a numerical model was developed to predict the motion of otoconia particles within the semicircular canal and the effect of the endolymph flow and particles on the deformation of the cupula.
URI: https://scidar.kg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/11425
Type: article
DOI: 10.1007/s10237-017-0912-8
ISSN: 1617-7959
SCOPUS: 2-s2.0-85018948378
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Engineering, Kragujevac
Institute for Information Technologies, Kragujevac

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